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To Change Reality-Change the Story P1

If you want to change reality—then change the story.

Sometimes, it is just a matter of seeing the same story from a different perspective, sometimes the story must be told from a different character in your story, and sometimes, the rules need to be changed. Stories have power to influence, inform, and educate. Maybe it’s time to take time to re-examine your story and retell it.

This week we will explore how individuals or companies were able to move forward into positions of influence by just changing their story. Let’s start back in the 1980’s, under Steve Jobs, the Apple mission statement, which was his company’s story was, “Man is the creator of change in this world. As such, he should be above systems and structures, and not subordinate to them.”

I think, back in the 80’s, this statement was ringing true with many people who were now starting to use more and more technology. For example, when you bought software it generally came with a lot of technical instructions, same with the computer and its components. The joke being played around during that time was that you needed a degree in engineering or be a programmer to understand the instructions.


In the 1980’s, there were many computers: Atari, Commodore, Texas Instruments, Kaypros and more. Compatibility and standardization did not exist across the board in these early years.

imac-vs-dellBy 1996, Apple was in a mess. Leadership was weak, Apple was searching for a new OS for the new millennium, and internal strife for recognition and power had brought Apple to a grinding halt. In 1996, Jobs returned and immediately changed the story. It was simple in its design and complex in its operation—a new term “Simplexity.”
Simplexity refers to an idea, or concept that appears to be simple to understand, yet is quite complex in its design structure. The PC back in 90’s was not user friendly. The back of the PC had multiple cables requiring multiple outlets for the monitor, PC, printer, and modem. Using the computer was not easy for the average person either. Cryptic commands and symbols were common.

Apple since that time has changed their story to, “Apple is committed to bringing the best personal computing experience to students, educators, creative professionals and consumers around the world through its innovative hardware, software and Internet offerings.”

Steve Jobs
FILE – This 1998 file photo provided by Apple, shows Apple CEO Steve Jobs pose for a photo with an iMac computer. Apple on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011 said Jobs has died. He was 56. (AP Photo/Apple, Moshe Brakha, File)

Jobs announced the simplicity of his machine with a new story advertisement– “There’s No Step Three.” Mac’s screen icons were easy to identify, and you didn’t have to type commands anymore—just use your mouse and click. Mac’s sales were soon back in the playing field and its momentum hasn’t lost ground.

A lot has been written about Steve Jobs, but I think in the end, it was not technology that changed our reality but his story. A story that captured people because they wanted to move from the complexity of getting the job done to the simplicity of being creative. So, how will your story impact the world?

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Getting Results

 

Consider this: 

st-valentine-s-day-massacre90 years ago, On February 14, 1929, at 10:30 a.m. four hoods dressed as policemen, two in uniform and two dressed in suits, walked into a garage of a known local gang hangout.  Once in, they lined up, facing the wall, seven men. The four poser officers suddenly brandished four sub-machine guns and massacred all seven.

Newspapers called it, “The Valentine Day Massacre.”  This was followed by a nationwide  outcry to halt gang violence.

submachinegunIn 1934, under the leadership of the new President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt, the National Firearms Act of 1934, was passed.  Its intentions were specifically to keep the Tommy sub-machine gun out of private hands.  Interesting enough the NRA supported the enactment of the new law.  It makes one ask what has changed?gun-control-7-728

90 years later, on February 14, 2018, at 2:30 p.m. one young man with a AK-assault rifle killed 17 people at a local public high school.  Besides the 17 killed, 14 were wounded.  In 90 years, what took four perpetrators to kill seven men—now only took one murderer to kill 17.

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sparkyIn 1929, it was J. Edgar Hoover, who voiced the cause for gun laws and more power for the FBI.  Today, it is Al Hoffmann Jr., a real-estate tycoon, who in the past has been the major Republican donator, and who has donated millions to the party.

But as of this massacre was personal in his own backyard of Florida, he had decided, “Enough is enough!” and has written an open letter to all donators and Republican leadership that funds will halt if future candidates oppose new gun legislation.

I have interpreted Al’s message as:  No Bucks for Buckshot!

This type of genre is called, “Spark-line’s.”  There are three reasons to use it:

  1. To inspire an audience to action
  2. To create hope and excitement
  3. To create a following.

As of today, 100-plus student from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School took a bus to Tallahassee to speak to their representatives.  Other schools around the country are following suite.  There is great hope in changing the laws pertaining to assault rifles.

Online social media, television, newspapers, and talk radio topics are hot on this one.  The students are being backed by Hoffmann and other contributors, students turning 18 and parents across the nation are excited about making the change our nation needs to protect it’s future children and government.

Back to my lesson, Spark-lines draw attention to problems we have in our society and our personal lives.  The idea is to create fuel to motivate an audience towards a specific goal or action.

Throughout history, people have been moved to action even one speech.  I think of Mahatma Gandhi, Winston Churchill, John F. Kennedy and so many others.  Spark-line stories are great to motivate engagement for all social causes.  The main idea presenting what the world will look like if the following changes are made.

I look forward to reading your spark-lines in the future.

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The Nested-Loop

In my junior high years, I loved collecting, trading and reading comics.  As kids, we brought our comics to school where all kinds of deals were made for the right story.  But, it was in my last year of junior high when my cousin Joel visited me with a special gift—a book.  He told me that as much as comics were fun to read he thought it was time for me to expand my vocabulary and world while reading science fiction.

s-l640My first book from him, “I, Robot,” a 1950 first edition.  This series was made up of nine stories which I savored every evening.  So popular was Isaac Asimov’s robot stories I continued reading them to Asimov’s passing.  I still have that original “I, Robot” book in my collection.

In more modern times, I have enjoyed stories from James Clavell, Michael Crichton, and Dan Brown.  These authors have a genius for weaving a network of stories into one complete story.  Nested-loop stories are the second classical genres I will be sharing with you today.

I saw Julie Heffernan’s artwork called, “The Scout III” (above) and asked permission to include it in this blog.  She asked me what I saw?  I told her, it reminded me of a storyteller who is creating a nested loop of stories within stories.  She agreed and granted me permission to display her artwork—which I’m most grateful for.

Speakers who perform nested-loop stories, like Simon Sinek’s Ted Talk, have the ability to explain a process while inspiring an audience.  The use of analogies and metaphors are also key in stimulating visual imagery for better understanding and comprehension.  In the end, the authors impart not only knowledge but wisdom, which the listener can pass on to others.  Check out James Burke’s, The Day the Universe Changed, and Connections.”

The nested-loop works like this.  You place your most important story (thought, concept, or idea) in the center and use stories at the beginning to draw your listener in.  The last story finishes the first story and ties in the center story into one neat package.

maxresdefaultWe find a good analogy of a nested-loop in the story of the “Godfather II.”  The story opens with young Vito Corieone witnessing the murder of his father, mother, and brother.  The center of the story covers the boy’s growth into manhood, where he becomes prosperous as both a businessman and a godfather. It ends with the beginning of the story as Vito returns to Sicily to take revenge on his family’s murderer.

stan-lee5Now it’s time for me to end this article, but I need to end it like a nested-loop, somehow bringing the beginning topic of comics through the middle and tying it at the end.  How?  How about—Stan Lee!

Stan Lee is known as the godfather of comics.   Stan Lee’s stories have moved from comics to television, to the silver screen; from movies to the game industry, now to online. Now that’s a real 3D nested-loop!

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Finding the Stories

Without material, you have no story.  So, where do you get the material?  Here are some thoughts.

First think about who will be your audience.  If you cater more to a Western Culture, who speak mostly English, then you will need materials and resources that your audience will understand.  Even though you enjoy writings from Eastern philosophies, like Sun Tzu, your Western audience may not get the point of your story.  There is a way around this and we will discuss this more next week.

If your audience is global, then it is even more important to understand what symbols in a multicultural world will best fit the stories you produce.  Lincoln’s repertoire of stories stretched from the Illinois’ back woods to the hustle and bustle of Washington elites.  From politically correct to obscene.  The key was in timing; knowing when and how to use them and what the ROI would be from the punchline.

Like Abraham, you have a lot of personal stories that you have collected over the years.  Telling a story that doesn’t always put you in the best of light can work for you, because that means you are opening trust and building a relationship.  Heck, we’ve all made mistakes, and when someone makes fun of his/her own short comings it can sometimes build a closer relationship with your audience.  This is key for stand-up comedians who tell stories that their audience can relate to.

Lincoln read books.  He created and developed his Strategic Stories from the Bible and other non-fiction books he borrowed or bought.  Books and stories are what made him a great orator.  John Kennedy was another voracious reader, writer and speaker.

 

Mary Bateson said, “The human species thinks in metaphors and learns through stories.”  Metaphors, for the Strategic Storyteller, are the most powerful tools for persuasive arguments.  Metaphors, if done right can engage and motivate your listener towards a specific action.  When you learn how to tell instead of sell, you will in the end, sell even more.

metaphorsfree

Reader’s Digest has a host of short and long stories that don’t take much time to read.  Here is one I enjoy.  How would you use this story?

A pastor decided one Saturday to call on a new parishioner.  When he got to the parishioner’s home he saw a car in the driveway.  He knocked and knocked on the door with no one response from within.  So, he took out a small business card and wrote on back, ‘Revelations 3:20’ and stuck it on the door.  It read, “Behold, I stand at the door and knock.  If any man hears my voice, and opens the door, I will come in to him and will dine with him, and he will with me.”

The next day as he was counting the offering, he found a message on his collection card, “Genesis 3:10” It read, “And he said, I heard thy voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked.”

See you Wednesday.

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Making The Connection

In the morning, I enjoy playing a game of Sudoku.  Sudoku is a popular logic puzzle that teaches about patterns and connections.  As I play this game, it tends to focus my mind and open it at the same time.  As I was playing it this morning I started to think about Abraham Lincoln.  Sudoku has a connection to President Lincoln?  Yes, let me explain.

In Sudoku, you start off with a 9 x 9 grid, which is further broken down into 9 smaller grids of 3 x 3.  The game comes partly solved with numbers randomly scattered throughout the larger grid (Fig. 1).  Your job is to find the missing numbers so that each smaller grid contains the numbers 1 through 9, while making sure the larger grid also gets filled with the numbers 1 through 9 horizontally and vertically.  No number can repeat horizontally or diagonally when finished (fig 2.)

Sudoku Fig1                       Sudoku Fig2

Fig 1: New Puzzle                                                             Fig 2: Completed Puzzle

Okay, you say, that’s interesting but what does Sudoku have to do with President Lincoln?  Okay, okay I’m getting to it.  Sudoku is about finding patterns, and like the game of chess there are known patterns that are sometimes discovered as you play though the game.  Once a pattern is established you start to make new connections to solving the puzzle.

Leonardo da Vinci wrote, “To develop a complete mind:  Study the art of science; study the science of Art, learn how to see.  Realize that everything connects to everything else.”

Abraham Lincoln was a master storyteller.  He gathered his stories from his past experiences, from other storytellers, from books, and from the Bible.  There didn’t seem to be a situation where Lincoln didn’t have a story to tell.  He is known for his stories that entertained, but he also excelled in delivering Strategic Stories that could change the direction of a river.

There are several examples on how Lincoln deflated his opponent’s arguments or diffused some opponents attack with just a quick story.  He used his stories to win arguments, votes, and to persuade changes that still affect us to this day.  Lincoln realized that when confronted with a daunting situation he would use a story to make a connection that would persuade his argument.

Newton Bateman, an educator and close friend of Lincoln, recalled that Mr. Lincoln “knew how to select and arrange the material, what to put in the fore-ground, what in the background, what to set up as the central figure, and how to make all converge towards the final climax. He knew how to whet curiosity just enough to hold the attention of all to the end, without giving the least clue as to the nature of the final explosion; and he especially excelled in that supreme generalship which enables an accomplished story-teller to keep his reserves out of sight till the opportune moment…”

Want to increase your visibility, leads, and profits?  Then tune in this week as I break down Lincoln’s storytelling patterns that will make successful connections for your business ventures.

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Choosing the Right Words

Two thousand years ago, Aristotle, identified a pattern and created a formula or template for what he felt was the perfect story.  He broke down storytelling into three distinct parts:

  1. Ethos is Greek for Credibility, which constitutes 30%.
  2. Pathos is Greek for emotions, which constitutes 50%
  3. Logos is Greek for logic, which constitutes 20%.

Today, we cover the topic of logic; however, Aristotle’s definition of logic is quite different from today’s definition.  Logic originally meant: “The Word” or “what is spoken.”  The choice of words in a story are very important, it is part of the reasoning support that creates a relationship.

As an Educator\Director, I’m often asked why Shakespeare’s language is so hard to understand?  To answer that I must remind people that the stories are 500 years old.  Words over the centuries have changed meaning.  Shakespeare’s words are well chosen and logical, but the presentation has changed from descriptive words to today’s short sound bites.

According to Aristotle, words identifying emotions are 50% of a strategic story.  In lab brainimagingexperiments speakers and listeners have their brain activity monitored.  When a speaker tells a story regarding an emotional event, his brain lights up parts of the brain (sensory, motor, memory, emotions, etc.)   Interesting enough the brains of the subjects listening likewise light up in tandem meaning—everyone is on the same page!

If the dopamine and Oxytocin are activated (see The Perfect Story) then credibility can be established, because there is trust and mutual emotional understanding.

This brings us now to the logic.  The words chosen are only part of storytelling.  Words must be chosen carefully to convey the emotional state the speaker is trying to establish.  How words are also spoken can be more important than the word itself.  This I learned while taking professional classes in Shakespeare language delivery.

Body language, hand gestures, facial expressions, voice tones and presentation are all part of the Strategic Storytelling system.  As we journey together, I will be adding and teaching more on this.  I’ve also been asked to create videos, which I’m in progress doing now.

Dodge&MLK

Just a week ago, Super Bowl 51, played out, and like most people watching the game they were also watching the commercials.  Images, words, and music are well chosen since these commercials cost their sponsors $5 million dollars for 30 seconds.  The one commercial that received an immediate negative response was from the Dodge commercial using in its background the words of Dr. Martin Luther King.  Twitter went hot as negative reaction to using Dr. Kings words to sell a car.  The words were good, the emotion established, but establishing the relationship—well let’s just say the Chrysler marketing team fumbled on their credibility, which is 30% of their story.

I write my blog with a maximum of 500 words.  This would take about 3.5 minutes to read out loud.  I am also interested to connect with you to answer your questions on how to develop your own Strategic Story presentation.

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The Story That Took A City

Yesterday, we discussed how emotions affect the human brain through storytelling.  Today, I will cover the second principle of Aristotle’s storytelling principles—Credibility.  Credibility means: The quality of being trusted and believed in.  According to Aristotle this attribute composed 20% of the presentation.

I could safely say; most people have heard about the Trojan War.  The Greek warrior hero, Achilles, and the Trojan champion, Hector.  The Trojan war lasted 10 years, about the same amount of time the U.S. was at war with Vietnam.  In both cases, at least according to, “The Post,” the American military knew they weren’t going to win.  The Greeks had the same idea.  They hoped to starve out Troy, but it didn’t work.

Both sides, at the end of ten years, left the enemies shores.  America returned to rebuild.  The Greeks returned to destroy the city and plunder all of Troy’s wealth.  If I ask people how did the Greeks win most will say, “They built a wooden, and the Trojans brought it into their city—and the rest is history.

The what, the wooden horse, and the how, bringing the horse in, are well known, but no one knows the why?  What convinced the Trojans to bring in the horse?  The answer came from one man who used a Strategic Story to convince the Trojans to bring the horse in.  In fact, the man’s name was written into Shakespeare’s plays, he was placed in the 8th level of Hell in Dante’s Inferno, and Niccolò Machiavelli described him in his book, “The Prince.”  Who was he?  A Greek officer named Sinon.

Homer made it clear in his story, “The Iliad and Odyssey,” that Sinon was the real hero.  After ten years of failing to breach the wall, Sinon came upon an idea.  Build the horse, which was a symbol of Troy, and put into its belly 30 soldiers.

Problem #1:  How do we get the horse in?

Problem #2: What if the Trojans burn the wooden horse?

Sinon had a plan.  The Greek ships would leave and leave only him behind, half naked, no weapons.  He would tell a strategic story and get the Trojans to move the great horse into the city.

When the Greeks left, Trojan scouts reported back to palace.  All came out cautiously.  Sinon waited patiently by the horse.  The Trojans approached slowly.  When finally confronted, Sinon told them he had deserted.  He told them that the horse was built to the gods to protect the Greek voyage home.  Sinon went further to tell them to burn the horse because any city protecting the horse would prosper from the gods.

Sinon

 

 

Sinon was tortured and yet held to his story.  Finally convinced he was telling the truth they embraced him and took both him and the horse in.  The emotions established, and now the credibility had been confirmed.

 

 

Even though the story centers on deceit, a fact of war, without Sinon’s credibility Troy wouldn’t have disappeared.  Tomorrow, Logic brings it all together.